I can’t believe that in all the posts I’ve shared here (upwards of 1000 now!), I’ve yet to share a foot cream! There’s a much-loved foot butter and a relaxing foot soak or two, but no foot cream—until today. This Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream is a continuation of our Eucalyptus Mint theme, and when I was thinking about lotions to pair with this scent blend my mind went straight to feet. I wanted to make something rich and lovely for a bit of pampering self-care for your tootsies.

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Our water phase has some lovely things in it; some peppermint hydrosol brings a lovely minty scent and light cooling sensation. We’ve got all kinds of humectant goodies; sodium lactate, panthenol, and vegetable glycerin. Sodium lactate is a very effective humectant, but I don’t tend to use it often as it doesn’t stand up well to washing (which my hands see a lot of), and too much can make skin sun-sensitive—neither of which are issues in a foot cream!

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

I chose Olivem1000 for our emulsifying wax as it creates the loveliest, thickest lotions—just the sort of decadence I want for my feet. To that we’ve added creamy, thickening stearic acid, rich shea butter, and silky rice bran oil. It’s a lovely blend, but there’s plenty of room for customization if you refer to the substitutions list at the end of the recipe.

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Some eucalyptus radiata essential oil rounds the whole thing off, though if you don’t have radiata, globulus is also a lovely choice. I haven’t tried all the varieties, but I do know lemon eucalyptus smells far too much like bug spray for my tastes, so I wouldn’t choose that variety (erk).

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

The final lotion is rich and lovely, but lighter than you’d think so you don’t have to worry about leaving greasy footprints anywhere. I’m a big fan. Let’s go pamper your toes!

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Water phase
52g | 47.39% (+10%) distilled water
20g | 20% peppermint hydrosol
2g | 2% sodium lactate
2g | 2% panthenol
2g | 2% vegetable glycerin
2g | 2% hydrolyzed oat protein

Oil phase
5g | 5% Olivem1000 (USA / Canada)
4g | 4% stearic acid
5g | 5% shea butter
9g | 9% rice bran oil

Cool down phase
0.115g | 0.12% vitamin E oil
0.5g | 0.50% Liquid Germall Plus (USA / Canada)
1g | 25 drops | 1% eucalyptus radiata essential oil

Prepare a water bath by bringing about 3cm/1″ of water to a bare simmer over low to medium-low heat in a wide, flat-bottomed sauté pan.

Weigh the water phase ingredients into a small heat-resistant glass measuring cup. Weigh the oil phase ingredients into a second heat-resistant glass measuring cup. Place both measuring cups in your prepared water bath to melt everything through.

After about 20–30 minutes the oil part should be completely melted and the water part should be thoroughly dissolved. Remove the water bath from the heat, and pour the water part into the oil part. Stir with a flexible silicone spatula to incorporate.

Grab your immersion blender and begin blending the lotion, starting with short bursts so the still-very-liquid lotion doesn’t whirl up and spray everywhere. Blend for about a minute, leave to cool for ten, blend for another minute or two, and repeat this blend-cool-blend cycle until the outside of the glass measuring cup is barely warm to the touch and the lotion is thick and creamy.

When the lotion has cooled, stir in the cool down ingredients and transfer the lotion to a jar. I used one of these great screw-top 100mL plastic tubs from YellowBee—this lotion is too thick to put in a pump-top bottle. Enjoy!

Because this cream contains water, you must include a broad-spectrum preservative to ward off microbial growth. This is non-optional. Even with a preservative this project is likely to eventually spoil as our kitchens are not sterile laboratories, so in the event you notice any change in colour, scent, or texture, chuck it out and make a fresh batch.

Substitutions

As always, be aware that making substitutions will change the final product. While these swaps won’t break the recipe, you will get a different final product than I did.

  • As I’ve provided this recipe in percentages as well as grams you can easily calculate it to any size using this batch calculator from Making Skincare. As written in grams this recipe will make 100g.
  • If you don’t have peppermint hydrosol, you can use more distilled water and add 6–10 drops of peppermint essential oil along with the eucalyptus essential oil
  • You can use eucalyptus globulus essential oil instead of radiata. I haven’t tried all the different varieties of eucalyptus; I suspect many of them would work well, but I would avoid the lemon version as it smells strongly of bug spray.
  • If you don’t have both vegetable glycerin and sodium lactate, just use 2g of whichever one you do have and replace the remaining 2g with extra water.
  • If you don’t have panthenol you can replace it with distilled water
  • You can replace the hydrolyzed oat protein with silk peptides or sea kelp bioferment
  • You can use Polawax, Emulsifying Wax NF, or BTMS-50 in place of the Olivem 1000, though all of these will make for a less luscious final product
  • Cetyl alcohol will work in place of stearic acid
  • Mango butter or cupuacu butter will work well in place of shea butter
  • You can use a different liquid oil in place of rice bran oil

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Eucalyptus Mint Foot Cream

Did you enjoy this post? Take a second to support Humblebee & Me on Patreon!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This