One of my favourite ways to bring a bit of Edwardian charm into my day-to-day life is an Edwardian inspired hairstyle or two. They’re perfect for my long hair, and the ones I’ve devised are easy, elegant, and they wear well today (that is, they are not overly poufy and pompadoury). I love them with or without hats (especially Downton Abbey like ones), and they work well for both day and night.

13-08-30-pic16

13-08-30-pic18

This is a hairstyle is one of my favourite originals, and one of the most wearable ones I’ve seen.

 

13-08-30-pic17

Downton Abbey hair—this is what I’m taking my inspiration from.

The base of all my Edwardian hairstyles is something I call the “twisted pull-back”. It creates a nice bit of body around your face without going all the way Edwardian, meaning you won’t be requiring the hair rats that were popular back in the day. It’s very simple.

Just to give you an idea of what I'm starting with—you don't need this much hair, but you'll likely need hair that's at least past your shoulders.

Just to give you an idea of what I’m starting with—you don’t need this much hair, but you’ll likely need hair that’s at least past your shoulders.

 

13-08-30-pic02

To start your twisted pull back, part your hair (I like a side part), and section off the front bits of your hair as shown. You’ll start to get a feel for how much you’ll need for different styles.

 

Tie the front sections into a loose ponytail—don't make it too close to your head or you won't have room to twist.

Tie the front sections into a loose ponytail—don’t make it too close to your head or you won’t have room to twist.

 

Flip the ponytail through and turn inside out. I generally twist it about three times.

Flip the ponytail through and turn inside out. I generally twist it about three times.

 

Et voila! All twisted up.

Et voila! All twisted up. Now we’re ready for some different styles!

From here I’ve got three basic favourites—a ponytail, a braid, and a bun. We’ll start with the braid—I love to sleep with my hair like this to prevent tangles, and I like to imagine the ladies of the early 1900s did as well.

Start by dividing your hair into three sections for a braid leaving the tail from the twist ponytail in the middle section.

Start by dividing your hair into three sections for a braid leaving the tail from the twist ponytail in the middle section.

 

Braid away!

Braid away!

 

View from the back.

View from the back.

 

Lovely!

Lovely!

Next up, the ponytail!

You're just going to do the twisting thing with all your hair now—gather it all up and feed it up and through the twisty ponytail, and then down through at the nape of your neck.

You’re just going to do the twisting thing with all your hair now—gather it all up and feed it up and through the twisty ponytail, and then down through at the nape of your neck.

That's it!

That’s it!

And the bun, which is basically just a continuation of the ponytail—handy, no?

Keep wrapping the ponytail through and around until you have a bun.

Keep wrapping the ponytail through and around until you have a bun.

Once you've got a bun/roll, make sure the loose ends are tucked in behind the roll and pin it down. I use a combination of large bobby pins and hair pins.

Once you’ve got a bun/roll, make sure the loose ends are tucked in behind the roll and pin it down. I use a combination of large bobby pins and hair pins.

Pinned up!

Pinned up! You can wrap it more loosely or pin it lower down for some variation. I find mine tends to settle downwards a bit, so I start high and let gravity do the rest.

Et voila.

Et voila.

And that’s it—my three basic Edwardian-inspired hairstyles! A big thanks to Haley for taking pictures of the back of my head for this 🙂 Stay tuned for for more hairstyles and other entries in the Everyday Edwardian series!

Save

Save

Did you enjoy this post? Take a second to support Humblebee & Me on Patreon!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This