Orange Wax


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What is it? A liquid wax that’s pressed from orange peels.
Appearance A dark orange liquid.
Texture Smooth and very thin—like water.
Scent Deliciously orangey! It’s wonderfully juicy and awesome.
Absorbency Speed Almost instant, it doesn’t feel oily in the least.
Solubility Oil
Why do we use it in recipes? For a delicious orange scent and its orange colour. Because of its almost instantaneous, water-like absorption speed, it also helps give balms a dry/drier finish.
Do you need it? Not really—you can use a combination of the fastest absorbing carrier oil you have (hazelnut would be a good choice) and orange essential oil in pretty much any recipe that calls for orange wax.
Refined or unrefined? I’ve only ever seen unrefined orange wax.
Strengths Delicious smell and lovely warm colour. It also has a astringent and antibacterial properties.
Weaknesses Orange wax is photo sensitizing, and may stain the skin in higher concentrations.
Alternatives & Substitutions You can use a combination of the fastest absorbing carrier oil you have and orange essential oil in pretty much any recipe that calls for orange wax. Because orange wax is liquid you cannot use it for any of the hardening waxes like beeswax, candelilla, carnauba, bayberry, soy wax, etc. as it has absolutely no hardening properties.
How to Work with It I love it in cleansing balms and body butters, and I’ve also read that it’s nice in candles.
Storage & Shelf Life Stored somewhere cool, dark, and dry, orange wax should last at least two years.
Tips, Tricks, and Quirks Orange wax is photo sensitizing, so don’t use it in anything you might put on before going out in the sun. Orange wax also has a 75°C (167°F) flash point, which is quite low—don’t heat it over direct heat an be careful with water baths!
Where to Buy it  Buy it from an online DIY ingredient supplier or Amazon.

Some Recipes that Use Orange Wax

Characteristics

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