How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

Alright, I’ll admit it. I have a clay problem. So, when I discovered that Bulk Apothecary carries a clay I’ve never tried before… well, guys… it called to me. A siren song of powdery, pore cleansing goodness, and I was powerless to resist. The clay in question is Sea Clay, and it’s from the Dead Sea. I find there’s no better way to get to know a new clay than a face mask, and hence was born this Salty Sea Mud Face Mask.

How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

Make sure you go outside and take some selfies with your face mask to confuse your neighbours.

Make sure you go outside and take some selfies with your face mask to confuse your neighbours.

Since it’s from the Dead Sea, Sea Clay is loaded with minerals—over 35 of them! It’s a fine greenish grey powder (much darker than the photo on the Bulk Apothecary website), and on the heavier side, as clays go. Not as heavy as bentonite, but nowhere near as light as the French clays or kaolin. I’d group it with rhassoul, weight-wise. It’s a bit sandy, but not overly so, and blends relatively easily with water to create a creamy paste. I decided to blend it with a bit of white kaolin to make for a slightly creamier, less drying mask, as I found the Sea Clay to be a bit strong for my tastes on its own.

How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask
How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

From what I can tell, Sea Clay is Dead Sea Mud in dry form, which has a couple advantages, my favourite being that it doesn’t come with a preservative in it. Because Dead Sea Mud contains water, most varieties you’ll find for sale come with an added preservative. I don’t have anything against preservatives, but it’s nice to start with ingredients that are preservative free and add your own if they’re necessary. I’ll always use a face mask immediately, so there’s really no need for a preservative.

How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask
How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

I elected to keep the rest of the face mask super simple. I added a wee bit of sea salt to the water, and some raw manuka honey. Sea salt amps up the mineral content in the mask, boost its cleansing power, and soften the skin. Raw honey brings lovely beneficial enzymes to the mix to help boost healing, as well as keeping the mask from drying out too quickly and dropping powdery bursts of dry clay onto your shirt.

How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask
How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

Everything comes together quickly and easily to create a wee pot of creamy, honey-scented goodness. I spread it on my face, took some goofy selfies for y’all, and washed it off about half an hour later to find my complexion smoother and clearer than before, but not too dry or red. Consider me a fan of salty sea mud face masks!

Yes, your hair will stick to your face mask...

Yes, your hair will stick to your face mask…

How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

5mL | 1 tsp warm water
1/8 tsp sea salt (I use these tiny measuring spoons for tiny measurements like this)
1/8 tsp raw honey (I used manuka, but you can definitely use plain raw honey as well)

1 tsp white kaolin clay
2 1/2 tsp sea clay

Kick things off by measuring the water and sea salt into a small bowl, and whisking in the honey. I like to dip a small wire whisk into my honey to grab it—the exact measurement isn’t that important, just eyeball it—and then use that whisk to whisk everything together. Easy!

Whisk in the kaolin clay first, and then the sea clay, adding it about half a teaspoon at a time. I find it’s best to sprinkle it over the water and let it wet out for a few seconds before whisking it in. It is a little prone to clumping, and you’ll probably think you’ve overshot the clay addition a couple times when you first start to stir after an addition, but the clay will break down and incorporate nicely.

When you’ve got a wee bowl of creamy grey paste that’s roughly the consistency of a soft frosting, spread it all over your face, avoiding your eyes, nostrils, mouth, and eyebrows (well, the eyebrows really only need to be avoided if you don’t want to look like a zombie Mona Lisa in photos).

Let it dry for at least twenty minutes before washing it off. This one’s a slow to dry mask, so I left it on for quite a bit longer (closer to 40 minutes) and really only washed it off because I was tired of having it on my face, not because it got extra tight or itchy like some masks can.

Follow up with a few drops of a hydrating serum—I’m in love with this one right now!

Want to make this mask in a big batch to use later? Read this!

New to face masks? Check out this video!

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How to make a Salty Sea Mud Face Mask

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