You know you have a DIY problem when you get a blister and your first thought is how to develop some sort of homemade something or other for it to help it heal/give you something to blog about. At least I didn’t give myself the blister on purpose… that really would be very odd. But! It totally paid off and in just 36 hours my foot was practically as good as new!

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Anyhow, after cavorting about downtown in a pair of very sturdy (and still relatively new) Frye boots, I had a blister. Actually, halfway through cavorting about downtown I had a blister. And then I still had another meeting to go to, and then I had to get myself home. I limped. I should really learn to carry moleskin. (Warning: blister pictures!)

Upon returning home I discovered a big ‘ol blister on my right heel, and a hot spot on the left heel. So, yuck, and ow, but hey, now I have a new DIY project to tackle!

The blister in question, right after limping home. Ow.

The blister in question, right after limping home. Ow.

The carrier oils I chose for the base are andiroba, emu, tamanu, and virgin coconut. Andiroba helps increase circulation and has been used by natives in Brazil for ages to help heal cuts. It’s supposed to be good for burns, wounds, arthritis, insect bites, and eczema, and it’s a great anti-inflammatory. Emu oil is a long time favourite of Australian aborigines for treating burns and bites, and today it’s very popular for helping with soft tissue injuries, bruising, and joint stiffness.

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Virgin coconut is a favourite of many. It’s a great moisturizer, and it smells wonderful. It’s also said to be anti-viral, antibacterial, and anti-fungal. Tamanu oil is a cure-all oil for skin ailments, great for acne, eczema, cuts, burns, bug bites, and more. Vitamin E is a great antioxidant and encourages skin regeneration.

The essential oils I’ve chosen were selected for their antibacterial (lavender, tea tree, origanum) and soothing (chamomile) properties. I’ve generally found that infection prevention + soothing = healing, hence my choices.

24 hours later. Less red, slightly deflated, and more sore than actually painful.

24 hours later. Less red, slightly deflated, and more sore than actually painful.

So, after all that, does it work? Here’s what happened. I applied the salve the first night, and every 12 hours or so after that. By morning, it was sore, and still fluid-filled, but less so.

The next evening (24 hours later) it had significantly dried out and didn’t hurt much at all (and I’d been on my feet for most of the day in a different pair of boots).

36 hours! No pain, totally deflated and dried out, and the skin isn't even saggy!

36 hours! No pain, totally deflated and dried out, and the skin isn’t even saggy!

The next morning (36 hours later); no pain, totally deflated, and well on the way to being totally healed! Victory!

The salve does tend to tingle when you get it on your hands due to the increased circulation, which I think is pretty cool.

Burn & Blister Salve

2 tsp virgin coconut oil
2 tsp andiroba oil
2 tsp emu oil (or more andiroba)
1 tsp tamanu oil
¾ tsp vitamin E oil

15 drops lavender essential oil
7 drops tea tree essential oil
7 drops chamomile essential oil
3 drops origanum essential oil

Place everything in a small tin or bottle. Seal the container and put it in a small dish of hot water (from the tap is fine) to melt, giving it a shake every few minutes, until everything is melted together.

Apply to burns and blisters every 6–12 hours.

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