Penny

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 451 total)
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  • in reply to: Essential oils especially lime #23409
    Penny
    Participant

    What I love most about fragrance oils, is the scent LASTS. Not quite so well in soaps when it comes to citrus but in lotions and anhydrous products its there. I made a Cucumber Mint Toner a few months ago. I added in peppermint essential oil and maybe 4 drops of cucumber fragrance oil. For the first week to two weeks, the scent of peppermint and that oomph on my skin was all I could feel or smell of the peppermint. And this was peppermint essential oil from a reputable French company (Aroma Zone). After a week or ten days, the scent and the tingle factor are gone leaving me with a faint peppermint scent and a clean cucumber scent as well.

    I find I have begun to trust fragrance oils a lot more in the past year than essential oils. There are way too many lawsuits happening these days regarding essential oils and purity, various ingredients/claims, and even just simply how do you know you are getting what you pay for? Fragrance oils are great as they are always giving me consistent results. And I find that I only need a few drops to scent a lotion so I get an echo of a smell, or a few more for a more potent scent. I get to control that, and I know it will be like that a month later without worry.

    in reply to: Would you pay $99 USD for this "wonder oil"?!? #23407
    Penny
    Participant

    Golly no.
    I have Marie’s video about hacking a recipe (the 1% one), and I’ve all those oils. I’d much rather spend the 99USD hacking the recipe. Sounds like a nice way to spend the afternoon to be honest.

    in reply to: FDA Cosmetics Regulations #23390
    Penny
    Participant

    Good morning Joyful!
    I was under the impression that Canada was voluntary for registering ones ingredients? That restores some of my faith in Canada! Woot!
    Thanks!

    in reply to: Soap revolution! #23362
    Penny
    Participant

    Are you talking about adding in 5% (on average, up to 8-10% in say shampoo bars) in a regular bar of soap? Where coconut oil is left at about 15-30% and the superfat is at 5-8%?

    in reply to: So many to choose from!! #23358
    Penny
    Participant

    I’d suggest going to the “Best of…” posts!

    Humblebee & Me

    That is where I would start!

    in reply to: adding glycerin to oil based lip balm #23357
    Penny
    Participant

    I am finally able to post!

    Infuse your aloe powder in oil. And then strain through a coffee filter. That is how I’d get your aloe into your recipe. I don’t like glycerine at the moment in my lip care as I don’t like the feel. But, I know many do. So toss up!

    in reply to: cocoa absolute, any oil soluble? #23356
    Penny
    Participant

    Good morning!

    I’ve been able to get my hands on two (soon to be three!) types of cocoa absolute and batting 50/50 at the moment. The first one I got from NDA UK and it was horrible. Disgusting. It rank like Chinese TCM. Gross. But, when I blended it in oils, the smell was quite nice! But a few minutes after shaking it, the cocoa absolute sank to the bottom. It was awesome to watch, but not cool.

    The second one I bought was from Dr. Adorable (Amazon USA), and no where was I able to find if it was or was not oil soluble. When I finally got it home, I made Marie’s Chocolate Lip Butter recipe (IT IS AMAZING!!!!!! Might I suggest some gold mica to your recipe???) first thing and used this cocoa absolute. It worked beautifully! And smells amazing! I use this brand of cocoa absolute in body butters, body sprays, lotions and potions. So I can tell you it is pretty awesome and one drop goes a long long long way.

    I will tell you, please be very careful. It tastes like ass. I went a lot heavy handed making a second batch of the lip butter last year, and lost an entire batch of Christmas gifts because it tasted so gross!

    in reply to: Glycerin In Lotion? #23355
    Penny
    Participant

    Belinda is right, glycerine acts as a humectant, so if you don’t add it in, it’s not a problem!

    If you have always added in glycerine into your lotions, I would actually advise you to try making a batch with no glycerine and one with half the amount you usually add in to see the difference.

    in reply to: Soap revolution! #23353
    Penny
    Participant

    Hi Maddie, I don’t know any other way to tell you this, but no. This is not totally accurate.

    Superfatting or lye discount, is the oil that is left behind after the saponification process (generally speaking), it is usually referred to as the “free” oils that have not been converted into soap.

    As I mentioned in a previous post, soapcalc by default sets the superfat of soap to 5%. That means 5% of your oils are not converted into soap. When you make a soap that is 100% coconut oil and send it through soapcalc and not change the superfat, yes, your skin will be in a lot of pain as you’ve just stripped it of everything. However; if you change the superfat to compensate for the over eager stripping power of coconut oil soap to 20% or higher, you have an very lovely bar of soap.

    For example:
    100% coconut oil
    Superfat: 30%
    AMAZING bar of soap

    But to make this soap even better:
    80% coconut oil
    20% shea butter or lard
    Superfat 30%

    I have tried superfatting these recipes at 20, 22, 25, 26, 28, 30, 33, and 35. I find for my skin, it likes the high percentage coconut oil soap at 30-33%. It is through trial and error that you learn how to set your superfat in your recipes.

    Most soapers generally would not put castor oil into a high percentage of coconut oil soap simply because castor oil helps to create large fluffy bubbles. With high percentage coconut oil soap, coconut oil does create very awesome bubbles all on its own.

    Good luck and don’t forget to share pictures of your finished soap! We love soap porn here!

    in reply to: Soap revolution! #23352
    Penny
    Participant

    I have already said this in a reply, but you can’t just use coconut oil. It has to be paired with caster oil or it can be very drying on the skin. Coconut oil in general is very moisturising, but when cured with the lye, a special reaction goes off. I strongly suggest using caster oil with it if you want a moisturising, bubbly bar of soap. Of course you can use other oils, but when you are using coconut oil, use caster oil. (both of these provide an excellent bubbly lather too!)

    Hi Maddie, I don’t know any other way to tell you this, but no. This is not totally accurate.

    Superfatting or lye discount, is the oil that is left behind after the saponification process (generally speaking), it is usually referred to as the “free” oils that have not been converted into soap.

    As I mentioned in a previous post, soapcalc by default sets the superfat of soap to 5%. That means 5% of your oils are not converted into soap. When you make a soap that is 100% coconut oil and send it through soapcalc and not change the superfat, yes, your skin will be in a lot of pain as you’ve just stripped it of everything. However; if you change the superfat to compensate for the over eager stripping power of coconut oil soap to 20% or higher, you have an very lovely bar of soap.

    For example:
    100% coconut oil
    Superfat: 30%
    AMAZING bar of soap

    But to make this soap even better:
    80% coconut oil
    20% shea butter or lard
    Superfat 30%

    I have tried superfatting these recipes at 20, 22, 25, 26, 28, 30, 33, and 35. I find for my skin, it likes the high percentage coconut oil soap at 30-33%. It is through trial and error that you learn how to set your superfat in your recipes.

    Most soapers generally would not put castor oil into a high percentage of coconut oil soap simply because castor oil helps to create large fluffy bubbles. With high percentage coconut oil soap, coconut oil does create very awesome bubbles all on its own.

    Good luck and don’t forget to share pictures of your finished soap! We love soap porn here!

    in reply to: Essential oils especially lime #23351
    Penny
    Participant

    I’ve found that essential oils are finicky. And the scents don’t last as long as I like them too. Then I figured out I only really add essential oils to scent something, so stopped using essential oils and began using fragrance oils in my products. Perhaps this is something you might be interested in doing too if you are just looking to scent a product? (Note: for face stuff, I generally use .01-.02% of fragrance oil)

    Cyn is the essential oil whisperer, like Belinda said, I am sure she will comment when she is free!

    in reply to: White CP soap #23350
    Penny
    Participant

    Grrr. Fifth time the charm??? I’ve been having issues posting.

    Kaolin clay will not give you a white bar of soap. It will turn your soap beige/tan/ivory/taupey the more you use. It is an awesome ingredient and I use it often, but it will turn your bars of soap not white!

    To get a pristine bar of white soap, you will need to use titanium dioxide. If you use just oils to achieve your white bar of soap, it will be white, but it won’t be a pristine white bar of soap. May I ask you why you don’t want to use titanium dioxide?

    Maddy is leaving out some very important details when she talks about a soap made with all coconut oil or a soap made with mostly coconut oil. Sure, high percentage of coconut oil soap is overly energetic in its cleaning, but in high percentages of coconut oil soap, one needs to adjust the superfat to compensate for the coconut oil in soap being to cleansing. Otherwise, it is very stripping. Great for getting out eating noodles with chopsticks stains, but not so great for the skin.

    Let’s say you take a soap recipe like Marie’s standard bar of soap and run it through soapcalc. It will give you a superfat at 5% which is soapcalc’s default setting. That’s a great recipe! But if you suffer from dry skin, 5% will seem overly cleansing and drying too. So you up it to 8%. Coconut oil soap or high percentage of coconut oil soap is the same way. If you adjust the superfat in the recipe, your soap will be amazing and wonderful! But if you leave the superfat at the default (5%) you’re skin will be stripped of everything, leaving you with very dry and in pain skin.

    My go to recipe for a high percentage of coconut oil soap:
    80% coconut oil
    20% shea butter or Lard (I love lard in my soap)
    Water Discount: 35%
    Liquid: coconut milk
    Superfat: 30%
    Fragrance: optional

    Both the shea and lard in coconut oil soap fly off the shelves as soon as it is ready.

    Belinda is correct in saying lighter coloured soaps will result in lighter coloured soaps. And if you are planning on using fragrance oils, be very careful and pay attention to the vanilla content. The larger the vanilla content, the more discoloured you are going to go!

    View post on imgur.com

    Let’s hope that picture link worked. The picture with the four soaps:
    1) flower: titanium dioxide into lard, tallow, shea, olive, coconut, rice bran, wheat germ soap LOTS of kaolin clay
    2) Middle- no titanium dioxide, coconut oil 80%, shea butter 20%
    3) Bottom: 100% castile soap (made with a slightly green pomace olive oil)
    4) random leg shooting out of the Middle soap: the same recipe as in the flower soap au natural. The tallow and clay contribute more to the tan colour than the other darker oils I’ve found.

    in reply to: Method for filling LipSTICK tubes (without a mold) #23349
    Penny
    Participant

    Belinda, it kind of looks like a strange thing. What are you getting us into?

    For the lipstick molds with the two holes in the bottom before the first lip, have you ever thought about taking a chopstick, getting a bit of product on the bottom, plugging those holes kind of like weighing down a wick in a candle? You’d have to work quickly and in cool conditions to get it right.

    And since the ladies brought it up, I think your blog is fine. From all that I have seen, most DIY skincare, craft blogs, kid activity blogs, baking/cooking blogs all have a similar sort of set up as each other. They do a write up on top and have the instructs/ingredients below. Anyone who has a DIY skin care blog will have pictures and similar recipes to each other. The joke in Marie’s comments is she can read our minds or we can read hers. And that is because we all kind of end up at the same conclusion as each other just at different times.

    in reply to: White CP soap #23342
    Penny
    Participant

    Grrr. Fifth time the charm??? I’m not seeing any of my replies be posted!

    Kaolin clay will not give you a white bar of soap. It will turn your soap beige/tan/ivory/taupey the more you use. It is an awesome ingredient and I use it often, but it will turn your bars of soap not white!

    To get a pristine bar of white soap, you will need to use titanium dioxide. If you use just oils to achieve your white bar of soap, it will be white, but it won’t be a pristine white bar of soap. May I ask you why you don’t want to use titanium dioxide?

    Maddy is leaving out some very important details when she talks about a soap made with all coconut oil or a soap made with mostly coconut oil. Sure, that soap is overly energetic in it’s cleaning, but high percentages of coconut oil soap one needs to adjust the superfat to compensate for the coconut oil in soap being to cleansing.

    Let’s say you take a soap recipe like Marie’s standard bar of soap and run it through soapcalc. It will give you a superfat at 5%. That’s a great recipe! But if you suffer from dry skin, 5% will seem overly cleansing and drying too. So you up it to 8%. Coconut oil soap or high percentage of coconut oil soap is the same way. If you adjust the superfat in the recipe, your soap will be amazing and wonderful! But if you leave the superfat at the default (5%) you’re skin will be stripped of everything, leaving you with very dry and in pain skin.

    My go to recipe for a high percentage of coconut oil soap:
    80% coconut oil
    20% shea butter or Lard (I love lard in my soap)
    Water Discount: 35%
    Liquid: coconut milk
    Superfat: 30%
    Fragrance: optional

    Both the shea and lard soap fly off the shelves as soon as it is ready.

    Belinda is correct in saying lighter coloured soaps will result in lighter coloured soaps. And if you are planning on using fragrance oils, be very careful and pay attention to the vanilla content. The larger the vanilla content, the more discoloured you are going to go!

    in reply to: White CP soap #23341
    Penny
    Participant

    Grrr. Fourth time the charm???

    Kaolin clay will not give you a white bar of soap. It will turn your soap beige/tan/ivory/taupey the more you use. It is an awesome ingredient and I use it often, but it will turn your bars of soap not white!

    To get a pristine bar of white soap, you will need to use titanium dioxide. If you use just oils to achieve your white bar of soap, it will be white, but it won’t be a pristine white bar of soap. May I ask you why you don’t want to use titanium dioxide?

    Maddy is leaving out some very important details when she talks about a soap made with all coconut oil or a soap made with mostly coconut oil. Sure, that soap is overly energetic in it’s cleaning, but high percentages of coconut oil soap one needs to adjust the superfat to compensate for the coconut oil in soap being to cleansing.

    Let’s say you take a soap recipe like Marie’s standard bar of soap and run it through soapcalc. It will give you a superfat at 5%. That’s a great recipe! But if you suffer from dry skin, 5% will seem overly cleansing and drying too. So you up it to 8%. Coconut oil soap or high percentage of coconut oil soap is the same way. If you adjust the superfat in the recipe, your soap will be amazing and wonderful! But if you leave the superfat at the default (5%) you’re skin will be stripped of everything, leaving you with very dry and in pain skin.

    My go to recipe for a high percentage of coconut oil soap:
    80% coconut oil
    20% shea butter or Lard (I love lard in my soap)
    Water Discount: 35%
    Liquid: coconut milk
    Superfat: 30%
    Fragrance: optional

    Both the shea and lard soap fly off the shelves as soon as it is ready.

    Belinda is correct in saying lighter coloured soaps will result in lighter coloured soaps. And if you are planning on using fragrance oils, be very careful and pay attention to the vanilla content. The larger the vanilla content, the more discoloured you are going to go!

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 451 total)