Magnesium Myristate

What is it? Magnesium Myristate is the salt of magnesium and myristic acid (a fatty acid that naturally occurs in palm and coconut oils).
INCI Magnesium Myristate
Appearance Fine white powder
Usage rate Typically 5–10% for loose powders. For creamy cosmetics and binding powders for pressing you’ll need to use it at higher rates.
Texture Magnesium Myristate is surprisingly creamy when handled—it has a wonderful, rich slip when rubbed between the fingers.
Scent Nothing much—perhaps a bit fatty or waxy.
Approximate Melting Point 130–150°C (266–302°F)
Solubility Oil, warm alcohol
Why do we use it in recipes? Magnesium Myristate gives our colour cosmetics both slip and adhesion—I find it provides more adhesion than the more readily available magnesium stearate. It can also used as a binding ingredient when pressing powders, but I tend to choose magnesium stearate over magnesium myristate for pressing as stearate is more readily available.
Do you need it? I highly recommend it if you want to make your own makeup—especially if you want to make items like eyeliner that have higher adhesion requirements than something like blush.
Refined or unrefined? Magnesium Myristate only exists as a refined product.
Strengths Excellent ingredient for increasing slip and adhesion/wear time in colour cosmetics—especially in more challenging products like eyeliners and lipsticks.
Weaknesses It is harder to acquire than magnesium stearate.
Alternatives & Substitutions You could try zinc stearate or magnesium stearate, but you will need to re-test the formula for performance and wear time.
How to Work with It Blend it in with the other powders in powdered cosmetics. In cream cosmetics it can be stirred into the oil phase. As with all fine powders, be sure to wear a dust mask.
Storage & Shelf Life Stored somewhere cool, dark, and dry, magnesium myristate should last at least two years.
Tips, Tricks, and Quirks Try incorporating a small amount of magnesium myristate into a recipe for colour cosmetics that could use better wear time—it works incredibly well!
Recommended starter amount 30g (3oz)
Where to Buy it  Buy it from an online DIY ingredient supplier or Amazon.

Some Recipes that Use Magnesium Myristate

Magnesium Myristate is a very commonly used ingredient in my book, Make it Up.

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