White Beads Appearing in Lip Gloss

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  • #18374
    AnaBee
    Participant

    Something interesting happened with the last two batches of lip gloss that I made. I made both batches in early December, and at Christmas everything seemed normal. It wasn’t until today that I noticed anything off. The lip gloss that I gave my sister was full of minuscule white dots! At first I kinda freaked, thinking the tiny air bubbles had filled with mold somehow. But upon closer inspection, I realized that they were just tiny lumps of solid oil, no bigger than pieces of body glitter (that’s what my sis thought they were!). After checking all the other lip glosses that I still have from those batches, all of them have the tiny bead things in them.

    These beads don’t seem to affect the quality of the lip glosses, as the melt/disappear quickly once in contact with the skin. But I think it’s very interesting. I’m not completely certain why they’re there, or why they took so long to show up. I actually kind of like them; they add extra interest to the glosses. But still, it’s strange.

    Has anyone else experienced this? I’ve made a few batches before these two, but this is a first for me! Any ideas why it happened? I think it might be related to the Shea butter, as I’ve never used it in my lip glosses before…

    Recipe:
    9g beeswax
    5g jojoba oil
    5g grapeseed oil
    8g shea butter
    18g coconut oil
    40g castor oil
    20g avocado oil
    3g vitamin e
    12g glycerin

    The first batch was scaled down, and I might have switched some of the liquid oils out (but I lost my notes, so I’m not certain).

    #18381
    Zil
    Participant

    If you burn shea butter It can form little granuals. Ive done in many times in the past when I was lazy and Microwaved insteady of using the stove top

    #18429
    Penny
    Participant

    I stopped working with Shea butter because if you don’t cool it down properly you’re going to get the crystals. And now I’ve a lip balm that is to die for!

    #18436
    BelindaSK
    Participant

    And you’re going to leave us hanging like that Barb?!?! I would love a lip balm that is to die for!😀

    #18474
    Penny
    Participant

    Okydoky! I’ve two standard lip balm recipes, “Winter Lippy” and “Summer Lippy”. Same ingredients, just different ratios.

    I usually make a batch each month and walk around with a purse full to give to people. I hate looking at people with dry chapped lips. Especially when they work with food. Heebeejeebees! Our heating system in China is pathetic, so basically you are pretty chilled most of the time and the air is about 10-20% humidity. I’ve never had one melt in my pocket.

    Winter:
    100g cocoa butter
    100g coconut oil
    70/80g beeswax

    Summer:
    100/120g beeswax
    100g cocoa butter
    100g coconut oil

    The summer one, well China tends to be blistering hot and humid for about two months, and just minorly hot and humid for the rest of summer. It needs to be able to withstand being in a purse, in direct sun without being all Wicked Witchy. This recipe survives a Mexican year, BUT leaving it in the car or tossing it in your pocket is a no-no.

    #18481
    BelindaSK
    Participant

    Thanks Barb!

    #20398
    janeofall
    Participant

    I read somewhere that this can happen if you let cocoa butter cool too slowly. The same thing happened with the first Ultimate Hair Balm that I made.

    I’ve made all subsequent batches of anything that involve cocoa butter by popping the molds or tubes into the freezer right after pouring them, and haven’t had any problems since. The balms stay creamy!

    #22567
    bellbottom
    Participant

    is it the coconut oil that solidified from the cold weather?

    #22570
    Marlene
    Participant

    bellbottom the coconut oil completely blended with the other oils in a lip gloss, so that couldn’t happen

    #24628
    MaddieDIY
    Participant

    I have read about this happening. Shea butter has two types of fatty acids. They both cool at different temperatures, therefore separating and causing the graininess. You are not meant to cool it over 113 degrees f or that happens.

    Hope that helps (even though I way too late to the conversation).

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