This scar salve is designed to help your scars heal up, and it’s loaded with healing ingredients. The oil base features healing rock stars like pure Vitamin E, vitamin rich rosehip oil, and andiroba, tamanu, and emu oil—all traditional healers in their countries of origin.

How to Make Scar Salve

How to Make Scar Salve

I also included some herb infused oils—calendula and plantain in olive oil. Both herbs are fantastic healers, and the infused oils have a really lovely herby scent to them as well.

How to Make Scar Salve

For essential oils I chose a blend of healing lavender, calming chamomile, rejuvenating helichrysum, and stimulating carrot seed oil.

How to Make Scar Salve

All these ingredients are combined into a super simple-to-make balm that can be poured into a tin or tubes (which make for especially easy application). I gifted a tube to my friend Robb, who is quite the wordsmith, so I’ll let him take it from here.

“After stupidly slamming my station wagon’s rear hatch onto my nose and splitting it open, I was left with six stitches and a nasty franken-scar. It was both bumpy and discolored. Being a dude, I was going to just ignore it, until I lucked upon a tube of this wonderful scar salve.
Applying it is something I would only do in the privacy of a bathroom, because anyone watching would no doubt wonder why this idiot would be applying lip balm to his nose. I mean, it is the same container, right? So I secretly dabbed it on, and waited dubiously for it to work its wonders.

I should mention that the salve is somewhat shiny when you apply it, so it’s probably something you’re going to put on in the evening, or at least when you’re not concerned about people staring at your glistening wound.

The scent is immediately reassuring. I’m picking up herbals and forest notes, and thinking how very spa-like I have become. I wouldn’t necessarily describe it as “manly,” but it does complement my after-shave, and the fact it is right on my nose means it needs to be appealing in a “scentsy” way. It is.

Okay, but does it work?

Two weeks into using the salve on a daily basis, I began noticing that the tissue itself was more even. A nose is never the place you want a scar, since there’s so little skin there and what does exist is paper-thin. Still, there was noticeable improvement in the texture and I might even describe my nose as “touchable” now. By that, I’m merely suggesting it has lost its gross-out factor because my wife does not say “ick!” when she presses her finger curiously onto the wound.

Perhaps even more than the textural improvement, I’ve seen the scar area return to a more natural skin tone. I no longer look like I’m permanently hammered, or that I just tossed back half a dozen gin martinis. From the right angle, and with the right equipment, my nose might even be photographable and not require a whole lot of Photoshop touchups. I attended my son’s high school grad and felt confident enough in front of the camera to look directly into the lens. Not once did someone shout out “freak!” or “alkie!” and I feel I owe a debt of thanks to that little tube.

You might even say it has been my salvation!”

How to Make Barefoot Balm

How to Make Scar Salve

Scar Salve

4g | 0.14oz vitamin E oil
4g | 0.14oz andiroba oil
5g | 0.17oz tamanu oil
5g | 0.17oz rosehip oil
4g | 0.14oz emu oil (can substitute with more andiroba oil)
10g | 0.35oz calendula infused olive oil
10g | 0.35oz plantain infused olive oil
11g | 0.38oz beeswax

15 drops lavender essential oil
5 drops chamomile essential oil
10 drops helichrysum essential oil
5 drops carrot seed essential oil

Weigh the oils and beeswax out into a glass measuring cup and melt in a water bath.

Once everything has melted together, add the essential oils and stir to combine.

Decant into tins or lip balm tubes and let it set up before capping and labelling. I found this recipe filled one 60mL/2oz tin and five 4.5g lip balm tubes.

How to Make Scar Salve

How to Make Scar Salve

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