I am so in love with these Snowflake Bath Bombs that I just might not give any of them away. The fizz away enthusiastically, releasing a rich, creamy lather and leaving bathwater feeling cushiony and rich and incredibly lovely. On the night of our first big snowfall (I shovelled the walk three times that day) I dropped a couple of these in a hot bath and read some more of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondō, and it was great. Afterwards I crawled into my pre-heated bed (a bed warmer is seriously one of the best things I’ve ever bought) with silky smooth, happy skin. Aaah.

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

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Bath bombs are basically a dry, non-salad-dressing-scented version of that baking soda and vinegar volcano we all made in third grade science class. We use citric acid instead of vinegar (some recipes also include cream of tartar, but I’ve only got it in tiny kitchen quantities at this point) as our acidic bit, and keep the baking soda. Whisk that together, add some skin loving stuff like Epsom salts, and press that together with the help of the tiniest amount of liquid possible, and you’ve got yourself a basic bath bomb.

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

Since our snowflake theme is all about creamy whites, sparkle, rich textures, and soft scents, I tackled these bath bombs a bit differently than I usually do. I usually come at bath bombs from the scent blend—if not entirely, it’s typically a large part of the “identity” of the project. Because baking soda, citric acid, and Epsom salts are all white, I knew I had the white part nailed, but I wanted to add some rich texture to ’em, and that’s where a good dose of whole milk powder and some Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate (SLSa) come in.

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

The milk powder brings some skin-softening fat to the bath bombs in what might be the easiest way possible, and the lactic acid content brings a bit of skin softening exfoliation (lactic acid is an alpha hydroxy acid, or an AHA). There’s also a soft milky scent, reminiscent of hot cups of milky tea. The SLSa fills your bath with the most beautiful, rich lather—it’s stunning. It’s not bubble bath lather, but velvety, dense lather that’s downright indulgent. Swoon.

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

If you’re familiar with bath bomb making, these are pretty simple. The only tricky-ish bit is making sure you really pack them into the mould—I found them to be a bit more prone to crumbling than some other bath bombs I’ve made, likely due to the milk powder. The quantities are a larger than usual as I’m anticipating you’ll want to make enough to keep and give away, but you can easily scale the recipe as all the ingredients are measured by weight.

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Snowflake Bath Bombs

540g | 19.05oz baking soda
216g | 7.62oz citric acid
216g | 7.62oz Epsom salts
96g |3.39oz  whole milk powder
132g | 4.66oz Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate (SLSa) (USA / Canada)

Mister filled with witch hazel (water is also ok if you don’t have witch hazel)

Coarse, large-grain “sparkle sugar” (optional)

Put on your dust mask and measure the powdered ingredients into a large bowl and whisk together, using the back of a spoon to break up any clumps.

Now it’s time to add just enough liquid to get the mixture to hold together in a mold. Not too much, though, or it will react in the bowl/mold, not in your bath. That’s why we’re using a mister (it’ll spread the moisture better) and witch hazel (the reaction isn’t as vigorous when you use witch hazel, plus the bath bombs dry faster).

So, spread your mixture out in your bowl so you have as much surface area as possible, and spritz. Then quickly stir/whisk thoroughly. Repeat until you can grab a clump of the mixture and it will just hold together after a firm squeeze.

Once the mixture will hold together, it’s time to mold it! I sprinkled a wee bit of sparkle sugar into the bottom of a quarter-cup measuring cup and then crammed  as much tightly-packed bath bomb mix on top of that. I found these bath bombs really needed to be packed tightly to hold together, so squeeze and press and pack until it feels a bit ridiculous. Tap that out onto a sheet of wax paper. Let dry overnight.

To use, drop in a hot bath and enjoy! This recipe will make about fourteen third-cup bath bombs.

Because these bath bombs don’t contain any water once they dry, they do not require a broad-spectrum preservative (broad spectrum preservatives ward off microbial growth, and microbes require water to live—no water, no microbes!). Be sure to keep them dry to ensure they last as long as possible—don’t let any water get into the container/bag you store them in and they should easily last a year.

Substitutions

  • You can use a different kind of milk powder if you prefer; goat or coconut would be nice
  • You can use Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (SCI) (USA / Canada) instead of the SLSa

How to Make Snowflake Bath Bombs

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